Nutrition

The Anatomy of a Boxer

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Water makes up a large percentage of the human body.  When you break it down and examine each part individually, you can quickly see how important hydration is to proper athletic function and sports performance.

So let’s look at each body part and how their “water-health” correlates with what you do in the ring.

Water – It Does a Body Good

Ready for some big, eye-opening, earth-shattering workout advice for this summer season?  Be sure to drink plenty of water.  Bet you’ve never heard that before, but before you dismiss it as the same ‘ole rhetoric, consider this…If you don’t drink enough fluids, not only will you become dehydrated, but you will also experience from some significant, NEGATIVE training implications.  Drinking enough water isn’t only about quenching your thirst.  It’s also about maximizing your training efforts and your performance.

Fight for Your Life

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When it comes right down to it, everyone is a fighter in one respect or another.  You may be fighting to become the next champion of the world or simply fighting for a better life. You may be fighting to get that next big promotion at work or fighting to improve your health.  No matter what your particular pursuit may be, it has similarities to what a boxer encounters every time he enters the ring.  That’s actually part of the allure of the sport.  It can easily be seen as a great metaphor for life.

Wet Your Whistle

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Oh yeah! The virtues of H2O. It’s time to praise them again.

Your total body weight is made up of approximately 50% water, with as much as 75% contributing to your muscle mass, so there’s no denying the importance it plays for an athlete.  It’s vital not only to the average human being, but especially a fighter who is constantly drawing on those reserves in order to perform at peak.

Hyped Up – The Boxing Buzz

Today, more than ever, athletes are bombarded with products that are marketed to increase performance, endurance and overall athletic ability. The question is, how many of these products actually work? And are they safe or are they doing more harm than good? I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen fighters at the gym or in preparation for a fight who are downing a Monster or Red Bull, thinking it is going to improve their performance. For one, all of these drinks have an incredibly high amount of sugar that are quickly going to be metabolized as fuel only to later cause a slump in energy or a “crash.” They are also highly detrimental for a fighter who is trying to make weight.  All of the additional artificial flavors and colorings are a definite no-no. However, there is one other common ingredient in most sports drinks that is somewhat controversial, but potentially does have psychological and physical effects that could hold some benefits?