HOLIDAY BLOWOUT SALE. SHOP NOW BEFORE IT'S ALL GONE. SHOP NOW

TITLE Boxing Blog

From inside the gym to around the world of combat sports, the TITLE Boxing Blog keeps you up-to-date with the latest MMA and Boxing news, training tips and fighting techniques. This is the kind of info you need to not only talk the talk, but walk the walk.

Boxing

  • The Mastery of Muhammad Ali

    The Mastery of Muhammad Ali

    By Douglas Ward, Marketing Director at TITLE Boxing

    Yes, he stakes claim to the title The Greatest of All Time. Many historians even consider him the best fighter, Pound-for-Pound, of any era. His power and presence extended far beyond the boxing ring; but what truly makes Muhammad Ali one of the best fighters to ever lace-up a pair of boxing gloves is a combination of traits that few athletes are able to wrap into one package.

    Let's break these down and look at each one, starting from the top:

    His jab. Jimmy Jacobs, who owned the world’s largest collection of fight films, once stated that, “On film tests with a synchronizer, Ali’s jab was faster than even Sugar Ray Robinson’s.” Jacobs contended that Ali was not only the fastest heavyweight, but also the fastest fighter he had ever seen on film. On top of the speed, Ali also used it accurately and often. He used it to dictate the pace of the fight and the range the bout was fought at. It is as simple as that.

    His footwork. He used it like military ground forces. His feet dictated when and where war would be waged. His quickness carried him in and out of trouble and was used to frustrate his opponents. Ali was always on his toes to maximize mobility and gain leverage on every punch.

    His reflexes. His speed and keen sense of the ring made him a difficult target to hit. He was able to make his opponents miss their punches by millimeters while always staying in position to counterpunch.

    His ring intelligence.  Muhammad Ali had a boxing IQ that vanquished more opponents than his athleticism did. From positioning to purpose, Ali was able to slow the action down, control it and simply react.

    His showmanship. To say he was the ultimate showman would be an understatement. He was a promoter, a publicist, and a performer all rolled up into one superior athlete.  This unique combination to "work a room" gave him the ability to name the round, give the reporters their story and the fans their money’s worth.

    His resilience. Although he shared the ring with some of the greatest punchers to ever climb through the ropes, Muhammad Ali only tasted the canvas four times, in 61 total fights. Henry Cooper dropped him into the ropes in the fifth round of their first encounter and Joe Frazier had him on the seat of his trunks in the 14th in the first of their legendary trilogy. Sonny Banks and Chuck Wepner even have bragging rights to have gotten Ali down, although Wepner’s was questionable. Beyond that, Muhammad Ali tasted and weathered the fire power of some of boxing history’s most enormous power punchers like Sonny Liston, Ernie Shavers and George Foreman. When his amazing defensive skills failed him, Muhammad Ali was still able to stand up against huge punches and a tremendous amount of punishment...maybe to his detriment.

    There are many nuances to Muhammad Ali's personality, in and out of the ring. His passion as a fighter, his compassion as a human being, and an insatiable appetite to shake up the world is a pursuit that no fighter can go wrong in trying to accomplish. Mimicking the best traits Ali had to offer may not make you the greatest, but…will allow you to make your mark.

    Shop Ali apparel and equipment here.

  • Pound-for-Pound the Sweetest Fighter Ever: Sugar Ray Robinson

    Pound-for-Pound the Sweetest Fighter Ever: Sugar Ray Robinson

    By Douglas Ward, Marketing Director at TITLE Boxing*

    His fundamentally sound fighting style, combined with blazing hand speed and knockout power in both hands, established Sugar Ray Robinson as what many would consider, pound-for-pound, the greatest fighter of the century. He was also one of the pioneers of modern-day boxing.

    Even the Greatest of All Time, Muhammad Ali described Ray Robinson as, "The king, the master…my idol." Robinson’s influence on him and many of today’s fighters can still be seen and was absolutely instrumental in some of the liberties boxers of today experience. He was one of the first fighters to begin making demands, dictating his own terms and creating his own rules about how the game would be played. Inside and outside of the boxing ring, Ray Robinson left an indelible mark as a trend-setter, torch-bearer and everlasting example.

    Although Robinson had actually been born Walker Smith, Jr (he had no middle name), he learned early on in his career and quest to become a fighter, how to work the system in his favor. When he was just fifteen years old, three years too young to legally fight, he tried to enter his first boxing match and when asked for his AAU membership card (to prove that he was an amateur and not a professional), his coach submitted one from a fellow fighter who no longer showed up at the gym. The certificate he used had the name “Ray Robinson” on it, so from that day forward, that’s who he became. He later picked up the additional nickname of “Sugar” after knocking-out a highly-regarded amateur from Canada who was stopping all of his opponents. At 118lbs. Robinson was giving up eight pounds against a bigger guy, but after stopping him in the very first round with a left hook, a New York sports editor told Robinson’s coach, “That’s a sweet fighter you got there. A real sweet fighter.” A lady sitting ringside overheard the comment and added, “As sweet as sugar!” You can guess how his name read the next day in the paper. “Sugar” Ray Robinson would ultimately go on to amass an amateur record of 85-0 with 69 of his victories ending in a knockout, 40 of them in the very first round!

    Turning professional in 1940 at the age of nineteen, Robinson raked up a professional record of 128–1–2 with 84 knockouts by 1951. In that span he began setting new rules in the business of boxing, as it related to the hot commodity called Sugar Ray Robinson, becoming the first fighter to demand and receive a percentage of television, theater and gate revenues. And by the mid 1940s he was commanding an unheard of $50,000 per fight.

    He was one of very few fighters at that time, who had enough power and pull on his own that we was able to avoid any mafia ties and outright denied them the ability to have any control over his career. Robinson also understood the value of diversification and the power of leveraging his boxing popularity. In addition to a few ventures into the song and dance and entertainment field, he was also able to capitalize on his celebrity by owning a literal city block of businesses in Harlem. Among a few were; Sugar Ray’s Quality Cleaners, the Golden Gloves Barber Shop, Sugar Ray’s Bar and Grill and Sugar Ray Enterprises.

    Robinson was able to accomplish and maintain all of this, while remaining a rising star, at the top of his game. From 1943 to 1951 Robinson was unbeaten in ninety one fights, the third longest streak in boxing history. He held the welterweight title for five consecutive years, from 1946-1951 and was the five-time middleweight champion between 1951 and 1960. His historic battles with Jake LaMotta, who he fought six times and won five of them became instant classics. He took on the best in the game and, during his reign, boxing was long on talent and toughness. There was no mention of a “bum-of-the-month” club when fighters like Kid Gavilan, Gene Fullmer, Randy Turpin, Carmen Basilio were all lining-up for their shot at Robinson’s title. He was the man-to-beat for two decades and was thirty-eight years old when he won his last middleweight title.

    After having amassed a career record of 173 wins, just 19 loses with 108 knockouts Robinson finally retired in December of 1965 at the age of forty four. Sugar Ray Robinson was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990 and has left a boxing legacy as sweet as anyone could have every imagined.

    Shop Sugar Ray Robinson Legacy apparel here.

    *This post was originally published on December 15, 2014

  • TITLE BOXING PARTNERS WITH OSCAR DE LA HOYA, GOLDEN BOY

    TITLE BOXING PARTNERS WITH OSCAR DE LA HOYA, GOLDEN BOY

    TITLE BOXING PARTNERS WITH OSCAR DE LA HOYA, GOLDEN BOY

    Kansas City-based company to produce boxing gear inspired by legendary fighter

    Lenexa, Kan. – In boxing, ‘Golden Boy’ goes hand-in-hand with greatness. In partnership with TITLE Boxing, Gold medalist and 10-time, six-weight World Champion Oscar De La Hoya and Golden Boy Promotions announce the release of gear designed by boxers for boxers. The moniker conjures greatness in memories of Oscar’s legendary career, in the bright lights of boxing’s biggest present day bouts and in world-class boxing equipment to be seen in gyms and on fighters around the globe.

    The partnership begins with the release of boxing gloves commemorating the 25th anniversary of Oscar’s Gold medal-winning performance on August 8 at the 1992 Olympics. He won the hearts of American fight fans with a dazzling performance in Barcelona and carried that power, skill and fan-friendliness into the professional ranks.

    “Oscar’s place at the pinnacle of the sport is undeniable,” said David Hanson, TITLE Boxing CEO. “Partnering with him and Golden Boy Promotions to tell their story through innovative, top quality gear is an honor.”

    Following the initial launch is the release of the Oscar De La Hoya Signature line, featuring training gloves, punch mitts and novelty items; and the Golden Boy line, featuring professional fight gloves, protective gear and apparel, throughout the fall and winter of 2017.

    “TITLE is a leader in the production and marketing of boxing equipment,” said Oscar De La Hoya. “We look forward to seeing the Golden Boy/De La Hoya name expand into another aspect of this sport.”

    About TITLE Boxing

    Since 1998, TITLE Boxing has set out to establish itself as an authority in the boxing industry through equipment design, integrity in business and overall involvement in the sport. TITLE Boxing is one of the world's largest manufacturers and distributors of boxing, kickboxing, mixed martial arts, karate, and fighting sports equipment, apparel and accessories.

    Oscar 92 Gloves

  • On-the-Job, In-the-Ring Training

    On-the-Job, In-the-Ring Training

    By Fernando Vargas - TITLE Board of Advisors

    Boxing is competitive. It's dog-eat-dog. It is mano y mano, so it's hard not to think about losing or winning, but as an amateur, it's NOT about winning or losing. It's about the experience.

    I tell my fighters all the time to focus on getting the experience and learning the lessons that you only get from getting in the ring.

    It's easy to get caught up in your "record," but lots of successful amateurs don't do well in the pros. It's not the same. So having a good record is something to try for, but it doesn't really mean you're going to be successful unless you get good experience along the way.

    As a coach, you have to be smart with your fighters and not baby them, but don't put them in over their heads either. You have to be real about where they're at and give them time to grow, but know when to "push them out of the nest" too.

    There's no perfect situation, but if you care about your fighters you'll know the right time and the right moves to make.

    At the end of the day you have to be a smart coach, but have fighters who fight. Getting wins feels good, but getting experience and the right kind of it is what makes champions.

    Bio:Fernando bio image_BOA

    Three-time World Champion, “Ferocious” Fernando Vargas fought with an elite class of
    fighters throughout the 90s and into the 2000s. He holds wins over Yori Boy Campos (which also made him the youngest Jr. Middleweight to ever hold that title), Winky Wright, Ike Quartey and others. Vargas faced the best fighters of his era in Oscar De La Hoya, Shane Mosley and Felix Trinidad, in what many consider modern-day classics. To this day he remains a fan-favorite because of his accessibility and take-no-prisoners style in the ring. Vargas currently owns and operates the Feroz Fight Factory in Las Vegas, Nevada, where he trains a stable of rising amateur and professional prospects.

    TITLE Board of Advisors:

    A running series of blog posts collected by TITLE Boxing through our relationships with individuals inside the sport. Fighters, trainers, managers, dieticians, referees and more have offered their words, and we bring them to you here.

Items 1 to 5 of 94 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 19